By Sy Mukherjee
October 9, 2018

Happy Tuesday, readers. This is Sy.

Millennials are killing everything from car ownership to home ownership to beer to vacations to the institution of marriage itself, if the headlines are to be believed. (Full disclosure: I am a millennial.) So why not add another victim to the list? In this case, the primary care doctor.

A Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) survey and followup analysis by Kaiser Health News found that 26% of 1,200 respondents said they didn’t have a go-to primary care physician. But, digging a bit deeper, the survey found sharp generational shifts fueling that trend: Nearly half (45%) of 18-to-29 year olds said they didn’t have a primary care doctor. That figure fell to 28% for Americans aged 30 to 49 and just 18% and 12%, respectively, for people in the 50-to-64 and 65-plus cohort.

Some of this can likely be explained by a divergence of needs. It’s not implausible to think that, the older you get, the more you may want to have the security of a personal medical professional versed in your health history.

But it also represents a sea change in thinking likely fostered by an increased emphasis on convenience (and, perhaps, increasingly transitory lifestyles), according to some experts. A same-day telehealth appointment in a stranger could prove more valuable to some than a long-standing relationship with a doctor who may not be available at the click of a button.

The broader question is: What long-term effects will this shift have on public health? People with chronic conditions, for instance, may benefit from the stability of a primary care doctor who can provide continuous (and, theoretically, more personalized) care. At the same time, Americans who live in the numerous areas with a shortage of doctors may have entirely understandable reasons for pursuing more transitory medical relationships.

Read on for the day’s news.

Sy Mukherjee
@the_sy_guy
sayak.mukherjee@fortune.com

SPONSORED FINANCIAL CONTENT

You May Like